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Authors: Tim Schilling 1 ; Mojtaba Soltanlou 2 ; Yeshwanth Seshadri 1 ; Hans-Christoph Nuerk 2 and Hamed Bahmani 3

Affiliations: 1 Dopavision GmbH, Berlin, Germany ; 2 Department of Psychology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany, LEAD Research Network, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany ; 3 Dopavision GmbH, Berlin, Germany, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Tübingen, Germany, Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience, Tübingen, Germany

ISBN: 978-989-758-398-8

ISSN: 2184-4305

Keyword(s): Melanopsin, Blind-spot, Optic Disc, Pupil.

Abstract: Retinal photoreceptors modulate the pupil diameter to regulate retinal illumination. At early stage the pupil-response is formed by intrinsically-photosensitive-Retinal-Ganglion-Cells (ipRGCs) expressing melanopsin, activated by blue light. ipRGCs’ axons pass through the optic nerve head, corresponding to the blind-spot. No photoreceptors except melanopsin appear to exist in the blind-spot. Contributions of melanopsin to pupil constriction in absence of classical photoreceptors in the blind-spot is not fully understood. We investigated how blue light in the blind-spot changes melanopsin-pupil-response compared to parafovea and periphery. The Post-Illumination-Pupil-Response (PIPR) amplitude reflecting melanopsin was analyzed for standardized time windows (1s<1.7s, 1s>1.8s and 2–6s) and expressed as pupillary-change. Bayesian analysis showed a BF>3 that PIPR>1.8s for blind-spot and periphery is not different. At times 2s–6s, a t-test comparison in the blind-spot condition showed a sign ificantly larger PIPR to blue compared to red light, confirming a melanopsin-pupil-response in the blind-spot. Taken together, equivalent stimulation in the blind-spot and periphery revealed comparable PIPR, although there are no rods and cones in the blind-spot. In absence of classical photoreceptors in the blind-spot, melanopsin seems to be responsible for pupil constriction in similar manner as in the periphery, which supports the presence of melanopsin on the axons of ipRGCs. (More)

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Paper citation in several formats:
Schilling, T.; Soltanlou, M.; Seshadri, Y.; Nuerk, H. and Bahmani, H. (2020). Blue Light and Melanopsin Contribution to the Pupil Constriction in the Blind-spot, Parafovea and Periphery.In Proceedings of the 13th International Joint Conference on Biomedical Engineering Systems and Technologies - Volume 5 HEALTHINF: HEALTHINF, ISBN 978-989-758-398-8, ISSN 2184-4305, pages 482-489. DOI: 10.5220/0008972404820489

@conference{healthinf20,
author={Tim Schilling. and Mojtaba Soltanlou. and Yeshwanth Seshadri. and Hans{-}Christoph Nuerk. and Hamed Bahmani.},
title={Blue Light and Melanopsin Contribution to the Pupil Constriction in the Blind-spot, Parafovea and Periphery},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 13th International Joint Conference on Biomedical Engineering Systems and Technologies - Volume 5 HEALTHINF: HEALTHINF,},
year={2020},
pages={482-489},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0008972404820489},
isbn={978-989-758-398-8},
}

TY - CONF

JO - Proceedings of the 13th International Joint Conference on Biomedical Engineering Systems and Technologies - Volume 5 HEALTHINF: HEALTHINF,
TI - Blue Light and Melanopsin Contribution to the Pupil Constriction in the Blind-spot, Parafovea and Periphery
SN - 978-989-758-398-8
AU - Schilling, T.
AU - Soltanlou, M.
AU - Seshadri, Y.
AU - Nuerk, H.
AU - Bahmani, H.
PY - 2020
SP - 482
EP - 489
DO - 10.5220/0008972404820489

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