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Authors: Takada Hiroki 1 ; Matsuura Yasuyuki 2 ; Fujikake Kazuhiro 2 and Miyao Masaru 2

Affiliations: 1 Graduate School of Engineering and University of Fukui, Japan ; 2 Graduate School of Information Science and Nagoya University, Japan

ISBN: 978-989-8425-35-5

Keyword(s): Visually induced motion sickness (VIMS), Stabilometry, Sparse density (SPD), Head acceleration, Transfer function analysis.

Related Ontology Subjects/Areas/Topics: Animation and Simulation ; Applications and Services ; Biomedical Engineering ; Biomedical Signal Processing ; Computer Vision, Visualization and Computer Graphics ; Cybernetics and User Interface Technologies ; Devices ; Health Information Systems ; Human-Computer Interaction ; Information and Systems Security ; Medical Image Detection, Acquisition, Analysis and Processing ; Motion Control ; Physiological Computing Systems ; Physiological Processes and Bio-Signal Modeling, Non-Linear Dynamics ; Wearable Sensors and Systems

Abstract: Three-dimensional (3-D) television sets are already available in the market and are becoming increasingly popular among consumers. The 3-D movies they play, however, induce the negative sensations of asthenopia and motion sickness in some viewers. Visually induced motion sickness (VIMS) is caused by sensory conflict, i.e., a disagreement between vergence and visual accommodation during the viewing of stereoscopic images. VIMS can be analyzed both subjectively and physiologically. The objective of this study is to develop a method for detecting VIMS. We quantitatively measured head acceleration and body sway during viewer exposure to both a two-dimensional (2-D) image and a conventional three-dimensional (3-D) movie. The subjects wore head-mounted displays (HMDs) and maintained the Romberg posture for the first 60 s and a wide stance (midlines of the heels 20 cm apart) for the next 60 s. Head acceleration was measured using an active tracer at a sampling frequency of 50 Hz. Subjects co mpleted the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) immediately afterwards. Statistical analysis was then applied to the SSQ subscores and to each index of stabilograms. Transfer function analysis indicated that the acceleration of the head in the anterior-posterior direction while watching a 3-D movie can affect lateral body sway, thereby causing VIMS. (More)

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Paper citation in several formats:
Hiroki, T.; Yasuyuki, M.; Kazuhiro, F. and Masaru, M. (2011). BIORESPONSE TO STEREOSCOPIC MOVIES PRESENTED VIA A HEAD-MOUNTED DISPLAY .In Proceedings of the International Conference on Bio-inspired Systems and Signal Processing - Volume 1: BIOSIGNALS, (BIOSTEC 2011) ISBN 978-989-8425-35-5, pages 433-437. DOI: 10.5220/0003155104330437

@conference{biosignals11,
author={Takada Hiroki. and Matsuura Yasuyuki. and Fujikake Kazuhiro. and Miyao Masaru.},
title={BIORESPONSE TO STEREOSCOPIC MOVIES PRESENTED VIA A HEAD-MOUNTED DISPLAY },
booktitle={Proceedings of the International Conference on Bio-inspired Systems and Signal Processing - Volume 1: BIOSIGNALS, (BIOSTEC 2011)},
year={2011},
pages={433-437},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0003155104330437},
isbn={978-989-8425-35-5},
}

TY - CONF

JO - Proceedings of the International Conference on Bio-inspired Systems and Signal Processing - Volume 1: BIOSIGNALS, (BIOSTEC 2011)
TI - BIORESPONSE TO STEREOSCOPIC MOVIES PRESENTED VIA A HEAD-MOUNTED DISPLAY
SN - 978-989-8425-35-5
AU - Hiroki, T.
AU - Yasuyuki, M.
AU - Kazuhiro, F.
AU - Masaru, M.
PY - 2011
SP - 433
EP - 437
DO - 10.5220/0003155104330437

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