Automatic Detection and Recognition of Human Movement Patterns in Manipulation Tasks

Lisa Gutzeit, Elsa Andrea Kirchner

Abstract

Understanding human behavior is an active research area which plays an important role in robotic learning and human-computer interaction. The identification and recognition of behaviors is important in learning from demonstration scenarios to determine behavior sequences that should be learned by the system. Furthermore, behaviors need to be identified which are already available to the system and therefore do not need to be learned. Beside this, the determination of the current state of a human is needed in interaction tasks in order that a system can react to the human in an appropriate way. In this paper, characteristic movement patterns in human manipulation behavior are identified by decomposing the movement into its elementary building blocks using a fully automatic segmentation algorithm. Afterwards, the identified movement segments are assigned to known behaviors using k-Nearest Neighbor classification. The proposed approach is applied to pick-and-place and ball-throwing movements recorded by using a motion tracking system. It is shown that the proposed classification method outperforms the widely used Hidden Markov Model-based approaches in case of a small number of labeled training examples which considerably minimizes manual efforts.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Gutzeit L. and Kirchner E. (2016). Automatic Detection and Recognition of Human Movement Patterns in Manipulation Tasks . In Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Physiological Computing Systems - Volume 1: PhyCS, ISBN 978-989-758-197-7, pages 54-63. DOI: 10.5220/0005946500540063


in Bibtex Style

@conference{phycs16,
author={Lisa Gutzeit and Elsa Andrea Kirchner},
title={Automatic Detection and Recognition of Human Movement Patterns in Manipulation Tasks},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Physiological Computing Systems - Volume 1: PhyCS,},
year={2016},
pages={54-63},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0005946500540063},
isbn={978-989-758-197-7},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Physiological Computing Systems - Volume 1: PhyCS,
TI - Automatic Detection and Recognition of Human Movement Patterns in Manipulation Tasks
SN - 978-989-758-197-7
AU - Gutzeit L.
AU - Kirchner E.
PY - 2016
SP - 54
EP - 63
DO - 10.5220/0005946500540063