Using Blended Learning to Support Community Development - Lessons Learnt from a Platform for Accessibility Experts

Christophe Ponsard, Joël Chouassi, Vincent Snoeck, Anne-Sophie Marchal, Julie Vanhalewyn

Abstract

Blended learning, mixing both online and face-to-face learning, is now a well established trend in higher education and also increasingly used in companies and public sector. While preserving direct contact with the teacher/trainer, it also provides additional electronic channels to easily share training material and to support interactions among all actors. This paper focuses on specificities of adult training such as their goal orientation, the higher level of practicality and the higher level of collaboration. We also deal with the explicit goal of building communities where learners are progressively sharing their growing experience. Our work is driven by a real-world case study. We report about how generic e-learning tools available on the market can be adapted to address the needs of such a use case and also present some lessons learnt.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Ponsard C., Chouassi J., Snoeck V., Marchal A. and Vanhalewyn J. (2016). Using Blended Learning to Support Community Development - Lessons Learnt from a Platform for Accessibility Experts . In Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 2: CSEDU, ISBN 978-989-758-179-3, pages 359-364. DOI: 10.5220/0005908803590364


in Bibtex Style

@conference{csedu16,
author={Christophe Ponsard and Joël Chouassi and Vincent Snoeck and Anne-Sophie Marchal and Julie Vanhalewyn},
title={Using Blended Learning to Support Community Development - Lessons Learnt from a Platform for Accessibility Experts},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 2: CSEDU,},
year={2016},
pages={359-364},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0005908803590364},
isbn={978-989-758-179-3},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 2: CSEDU,
TI - Using Blended Learning to Support Community Development - Lessons Learnt from a Platform for Accessibility Experts
SN - 978-989-758-179-3
AU - Ponsard C.
AU - Chouassi J.
AU - Snoeck V.
AU - Marchal A.
AU - Vanhalewyn J.
PY - 2016
SP - 359
EP - 364
DO - 10.5220/0005908803590364