Older Adults, Learning and Technology - An Exploration of Tangible Interaction and Multimodal Representation of Information

Emma Murphy

Abstract

This paper explores concepts of tangible interaction and multimodal representation of information framed by the theories of universal design for learning (UDL) to enhance learning for older adults. Two participatory user panels were organised to explore the potential of assistive technology and tangible interaction to engage and support older learners. A creative co-design method using a rich user scenario with practical demonstration examples was used. Existing assistive technologies designed for users with visual impairments and a novel design prototype were presented to participants. This design prototype is based on the idea of linking physical fixed learning materials with digital multimodal representations. Feedback on the existing and new interactive tools are presented based on the reactions and ideas of 7 older adult students between the ages of 57 and 76. Participants were not familiar with examples of assistive technology such as screenreaders and magnification, but were interested in exploring new ways to have information represented through multiple modalities for learning.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Murphy E. (2016). Older Adults, Learning and Technology - An Exploration of Tangible Interaction and Multimodal Representation of Information . In Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU, ISBN 978-989-758-179-3, pages 359-367. DOI: 10.5220/0005809603590367


in Bibtex Style

@conference{csedu16,
author={Emma Murphy},
title={Older Adults, Learning and Technology - An Exploration of Tangible Interaction and Multimodal Representation of Information},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU,},
year={2016},
pages={359-367},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0005809603590367},
isbn={978-989-758-179-3},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 1: CSEDU,
TI - Older Adults, Learning and Technology - An Exploration of Tangible Interaction and Multimodal Representation of Information
SN - 978-989-758-179-3
AU - Murphy E.
PY - 2016
SP - 359
EP - 367
DO - 10.5220/0005809603590367