AFRICAN LANGUAGES AND ICT EDUCATION - Attitudes of Black University Students

Lorenzo Dalvit, Sarah Murray, Alfredo Terzoli

Abstract

In South Africa, English plays a dominant role compared to African languages in empowering domain. Better access to Education through the use of African languages is an object of heated debate. This paper shows that an intervention involving the use of an African language in the domain of ICT Education can change the attitudes of Black university students. The methodology used included a survey with preliminary and follow-up questionnaires and interviews and an intervention involving the use of localised software and of an on-line glossary of computer terms translated, explained and exemplified in an African language (isiXhosa). This experience increased the support for the use of African languages as additional LoLT, even in the English-dominated field of study of Computer Science. This is an initial step towards promoting linguistic equality between English and African languages and social equality between their speakers.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Dalvit L., Murray S. and Terzoli A. (2011). AFRICAN LANGUAGES AND ICT EDUCATION - Attitudes of Black University Students . In Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 2: CSEDU, ISBN 978-989-8425-50-8, pages 171-179. DOI: 10.5220/0003350701710179


in Bibtex Style

@conference{csedu11,
author={Lorenzo Dalvit and Sarah Murray and Alfredo Terzoli},
title={AFRICAN LANGUAGES AND ICT EDUCATION - Attitudes of Black University Students},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 2: CSEDU,},
year={2011},
pages={171-179},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0003350701710179},
isbn={978-989-8425-50-8},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 2: CSEDU,
TI - AFRICAN LANGUAGES AND ICT EDUCATION - Attitudes of Black University Students
SN - 978-989-8425-50-8
AU - Dalvit L.
AU - Murray S.
AU - Terzoli A.
PY - 2011
SP - 171
EP - 179
DO - 10.5220/0003350701710179