Graph-based Analysis of Genetic Features Associated with Mobile Elements in Crohn’s Disease and Healthy Gut Microbiomes

Julia Warnke-Sommer, Hesham Ali

Abstract

Horizontal gene transfer is a major driver of bacterial evolution and adaptation to niche environments. This holds true for the complex microbiome of the human gut. Crohn’s disease is a debilitating condition characterized by inflammation and gut bacteria dysbiosis. In previous research, we analyzed transposase associated antibiotic resistance genes in Crohn’s disease and healthy gut microbiome metagenomics data sets using a graph mining approach. Results demonstrated that there were significant differences in the type and bacterial distribution of transposase-associated antibiotic resistance genes in the Crohn’s and healthy data sets. In this paper, we extend the previous research by considering all gene features associated with transposase sequences in the Crohn’s disease and healthy data sets. Results demonstrate that some transposase-associated features are more prevalent in Crohn’s disease data sets than healthy data sets. This study may provide insights into the adaptation of bacteria to gut conditions such as Crohn’s disease.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Warnke-Sommer J. and Ali H. (2017). Graph-based Analysis of Genetic Features Associated with Mobile Elements in Crohn’s Disease and Healthy Gut Microbiomes . In Proceedings of the 10th International Joint Conference on Biomedical Engineering Systems and Technologies - Volume 3: BIOINFORMATICS, (BIOSTEC 2017) ISBN 978-989-758-214-1, pages 104-114. DOI: 10.5220/0006254201040114


in Bibtex Style

@conference{bioinformatics17,
author={Julia Warnke-Sommer and Hesham Ali},
title={Graph-based Analysis of Genetic Features Associated with Mobile Elements in Crohn’s Disease and Healthy Gut Microbiomes},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 10th International Joint Conference on Biomedical Engineering Systems and Technologies - Volume 3: BIOINFORMATICS, (BIOSTEC 2017)},
year={2017},
pages={104-114},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0006254201040114},
isbn={978-989-758-214-1},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 10th International Joint Conference on Biomedical Engineering Systems and Technologies - Volume 3: BIOINFORMATICS, (BIOSTEC 2017)
TI - Graph-based Analysis of Genetic Features Associated with Mobile Elements in Crohn’s Disease and Healthy Gut Microbiomes
SN - 978-989-758-214-1
AU - Warnke-Sommer J.
AU - Ali H.
PY - 2017
SP - 104
EP - 114
DO - 10.5220/0006254201040114