Importance of Sequence Design Methods Considering Hybridization Kinetics for in vivo DNA Computers

Toshihiro Kojima, Akira Suyama

Abstract

A DNA computer is a DNA-based synthetic system inspired by biology. One of the goals of DNA computer research is to develop an in vivo DNA computer, which can function within living cells through non-destructively processing intracellular signals under isothermal conditions. DNA computers working in isothermal conditions need a set of nucleotide sequences satisfying a kinetic condition in addition to the thermodynamic conditions considered previously, because the progress of computation under isothermal conditions is often dominated by the rate of nucleic acid hybridization reactions. We thus developed a method to predict the hybridization reaction rate from nucleotide sequences and have demonstrated experimentally the importance of hybridization reaction rates and the usefulness of our method. The present method is general and can be used to develop any hybridization-based DNA/RNA system such as DNA computers, DNA sensors, DNA nanostructures, and nucleic acid drugs, working in isothermal conditions.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Kojima T. and Suyama A. (2017). Importance of Sequence Design Methods Considering Hybridization Kinetics for in vivo DNA Computers . In Proceedings of the 10th International Joint Conference on Biomedical Engineering Systems and Technologies - Volume 4: BIOSIGNALS, (BIOSTEC 2017) ISBN 978-989-758-212-7, pages 248-252. DOI: 10.5220/0006246902480252


in Bibtex Style

@conference{biosignals17,
author={Toshihiro Kojima and Akira Suyama},
title={Importance of Sequence Design Methods Considering Hybridization Kinetics for in vivo DNA Computers},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 10th International Joint Conference on Biomedical Engineering Systems and Technologies - Volume 4: BIOSIGNALS, (BIOSTEC 2017)},
year={2017},
pages={248-252},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0006246902480252},
isbn={978-989-758-212-7},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 10th International Joint Conference on Biomedical Engineering Systems and Technologies - Volume 4: BIOSIGNALS, (BIOSTEC 2017)
TI - Importance of Sequence Design Methods Considering Hybridization Kinetics for in vivo DNA Computers
SN - 978-989-758-212-7
AU - Kojima T.
AU - Suyama A.
PY - 2017
SP - 248
EP - 252
DO - 10.5220/0006246902480252