Using Virtual Reality Techniques to Study Cognitive Processes in Car Driving Activity

Emmanuelle Ménétrier, Paul Richard, Vincent Boucher, Christophe Boujon

Abstract

A central question in cognitive sciences is how behaviors adapted to the situations encountered are produced. This question can be addressed in different ways and often requires the researcher to choose between highly controlled and standardized laboratory situations (commonly referred to as artificial settings) and studies undertaken in natural settings which may be more realistic, but cannot be controlled as required by a rigorous scientific approach. Using car driving as an example, our study will show how virtual reality (VR) offers a compromise between these two alternatives. Indeed, VR can simulate controlled immersive environments that offer different levels of realism. Moreover, VR makes it possible to implement different devices. For instance, VR enables researchers to analyze oculomotor behavior, which is fundamental in the field of car driving and is considered an indicator of attentional deployment. The work presented in this paper is based on a car driving simulator currently under development and aimed at studying the cognitive processes involved in car driving such as attentional processes and anticipatory mechanisms.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Ménétrier E., Richard P., Boucher V. and Boujon C. (2017). Using Virtual Reality Techniques to Study Cognitive Processes in Car Driving Activity . In Proceedings of the 12th International Joint Conference on Computer Vision, Imaging and Computer Graphics Theory and Applications - Volume 2: HUCAPP, (VISIGRAPP 2017) ISBN 978-989-758-229-5, pages 138-145. DOI: 10.5220/0006230901380145


in Bibtex Style

@conference{hucapp17,
author={Emmanuelle Ménétrier and Paul Richard and Vincent Boucher and Christophe Boujon},
title={Using Virtual Reality Techniques to Study Cognitive Processes in Car Driving Activity},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 12th International Joint Conference on Computer Vision, Imaging and Computer Graphics Theory and Applications - Volume 2: HUCAPP, (VISIGRAPP 2017)},
year={2017},
pages={138-145},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0006230901380145},
isbn={978-989-758-229-5},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 12th International Joint Conference on Computer Vision, Imaging and Computer Graphics Theory and Applications - Volume 2: HUCAPP, (VISIGRAPP 2017)
TI - Using Virtual Reality Techniques to Study Cognitive Processes in Car Driving Activity
SN - 978-989-758-229-5
AU - Ménétrier E.
AU - Richard P.
AU - Boucher V.
AU - Boujon C.
PY - 2017
SP - 138
EP - 145
DO - 10.5220/0006230901380145