The MEDEA Experiment - Can You Accelerate Simulation-based Learning by Combining Information Visualization and Interaction Design Principles?

Christopher J. Garasi, Richard R. Drake, John-Mark Collins, Rafael Picco, Benjamin E. Hankin

Abstract

The intent of the multipurpose display engineering analysis (MEDEA) experiment was to apply the principles of computer-mediated learning and “play” in the context of high-performance computing (HPC) modeling analysis. Our approach involved the development of software workflow based on interaction design principles using a team of graphic artists, experts in graphics- and touch-based displays, computer programmers, and scientists. The desired outcome was to develop software to overcome perceived HPC modeling usage and learning barriers common to scientific modeling and visualization. Using multiple interaction types, a variety of user workflow experiences were captured (novice/learner, analyst, expert) resulting in a more intuitive and enjoyable experience with a workflow which fosters accelerated learning.

References

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Garasi C., Drake R., Collins J., Picco R. and Hankin B. (2017). The MEDEA Experiment - Can You Accelerate Simulation-based Learning by Combining Information Visualization and Interaction Design Principles? . In Proceedings of the 12th International Joint Conference on Computer Vision, Imaging and Computer Graphics Theory and Applications - Volume 3: IVAPP, (VISIGRAPP 2017) ISBN 978-989-758-228-8, pages 299-304. DOI: 10.5220/0006228202990304


in Bibtex Style

@conference{ivapp17,
author={Christopher J. Garasi and Richard R. Drake and John-Mark Collins and Rafael Picco and Benjamin E. Hankin},
title={The MEDEA Experiment - Can You Accelerate Simulation-based Learning by Combining Information Visualization and Interaction Design Principles?},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 12th International Joint Conference on Computer Vision, Imaging and Computer Graphics Theory and Applications - Volume 3: IVAPP, (VISIGRAPP 2017)},
year={2017},
pages={299-304},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0006228202990304},
isbn={978-989-758-228-8},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 12th International Joint Conference on Computer Vision, Imaging and Computer Graphics Theory and Applications - Volume 3: IVAPP, (VISIGRAPP 2017)
TI - The MEDEA Experiment - Can You Accelerate Simulation-based Learning by Combining Information Visualization and Interaction Design Principles?
SN - 978-989-758-228-8
AU - Garasi C.
AU - Drake R.
AU - Collins J.
AU - Picco R.
AU - Hankin B.
PY - 2017
SP - 299
EP - 304
DO - 10.5220/0006228202990304