Police Officer Dynamic Positioning for Incident Response and Community Presence - Using Maximum Demand Coverage and Kernel Density Estimation to Plan Patrols

Johanna Leigh, Lisa Jackson, Sarah Dunnett

Abstract

Police Forces are under a constant struggle to provide the best service possible with limited and decreasing resources. One area where service cannot be compromised is incident response. Resources which are assigned to incident response must provide attendance to the scene of an incident in a timely manner to protect the public. To ensure the possible demand is met maximum coverage location planning can be used so response officers are located in the most effective position for incident response. This is not the only concern of response officer positioning. Location planning must also consider targeting high crime areas, hotspots, as an officer presence in these areas can reduce crime levels and hence reduce future demand on the response officers. In this work hotspots are found using quadratic kernel density estimation with historical crime data. These are then used to produce optimal dynamic patrol routes for response officers to follow. Dynamic patrol routes result in reduced response times and reduced crime levels in hotspot areas resulting in a lower demand on response officers.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Leigh J., Jackson L. and Dunnett S. (2016). Police Officer Dynamic Positioning for Incident Response and Community Presence - Using Maximum Demand Coverage and Kernel Density Estimation to Plan Patrols . In Proceedings of 5th the International Conference on Operations Research and Enterprise Systems - Volume 1: ICORES, ISBN 978-989-758-171-7, pages 261-270. DOI: 10.5220/0005705402610270


in Bibtex Style

@conference{icores16,
author={Johanna Leigh and Lisa Jackson and Sarah Dunnett},
title={Police Officer Dynamic Positioning for Incident Response and Community Presence - Using Maximum Demand Coverage and Kernel Density Estimation to Plan Patrols},
booktitle={Proceedings of 5th the International Conference on Operations Research and Enterprise Systems - Volume 1: ICORES,},
year={2016},
pages={261-270},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0005705402610270},
isbn={978-989-758-171-7},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of 5th the International Conference on Operations Research and Enterprise Systems - Volume 1: ICORES,
TI - Police Officer Dynamic Positioning for Incident Response and Community Presence - Using Maximum Demand Coverage and Kernel Density Estimation to Plan Patrols
SN - 978-989-758-171-7
AU - Leigh J.
AU - Jackson L.
AU - Dunnett S.
PY - 2016
SP - 261
EP - 270
DO - 10.5220/0005705402610270