Imitating Gender as a Measure for Artificial Intelligence: - Is It Necessary?

Huma Shah, Kevin Warwick

Abstract

Should intelligent agents and robots possess gender? If so, which gender and why? The authors explore one root of the gender-in-AI question from Turing’s introductory male-female imitation game, which matured to his famous Turing test examining machine thinking and measuring its intelligence against humans. What we find is gender is not clear cut and is a social construct. Nonetheless there are useful applications for gender-cued intelligent agents, for example robots caring for elderly patients in their own home.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Shah H. and Warwick K. (2016). Imitating Gender as a Measure for Artificial Intelligence: - Is It Necessary? . In Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Agents and Artificial Intelligence - Volume 1: ICAART, ISBN 978-989-758-172-4, pages 126-131. DOI: 10.5220/0005673901260131


in Bibtex Style

@conference{icaart16,
author={Huma Shah and Kevin Warwick},
title={Imitating Gender as a Measure for Artificial Intelligence: - Is It Necessary?},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Agents and Artificial Intelligence - Volume 1: ICAART,},
year={2016},
pages={126-131},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0005673901260131},
isbn={978-989-758-172-4},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Agents and Artificial Intelligence - Volume 1: ICAART,
TI - Imitating Gender as a Measure for Artificial Intelligence: - Is It Necessary?
SN - 978-989-758-172-4
AU - Shah H.
AU - Warwick K.
PY - 2016
SP - 126
EP - 131
DO - 10.5220/0005673901260131