Link Between Gaming Communities in YouTube and Computer Science

Lassi Haaranen, Rodrigo Duran

Abstract

Playing games has become a permanent part of popular culture, and the number of players keeps increasing. Part of this phenomenon is the act of recording gameplay and sharing the videos creating online gaming communities. We describe different types of gaming videos that intersect with learning computer science (CS). In addition, we looked at the discussions those videos spurred and found a rich interaction with CS topics. Since games can act as an engaging environment for informal learning, we conclude that the gaming community has relevant connections to learning CS and we as the research community should pay more attention to this phenomenon.

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Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Haaranen L. and Duran R. (2017). Link Between Gaming Communities in YouTube and Computer Science . In Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 2: CSEDU, ISBN 978-989-758-240-0, pages 17-24. DOI: 10.5220/0006267000170024


in Bibtex Style

@conference{csedu17,
author={Lassi Haaranen and Rodrigo Duran},
title={Link Between Gaming Communities in YouTube and Computer Science},
booktitle={Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 2: CSEDU,},
year={2017},
pages={17-24},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0006267000170024},
isbn={978-989-758-240-0},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Supported Education - Volume 2: CSEDU,
TI - Link Between Gaming Communities in YouTube and Computer Science
SN - 978-989-758-240-0
AU - Haaranen L.
AU - Duran R.
PY - 2017
SP - 17
EP - 24
DO - 10.5220/0006267000170024