AN AGENT FOR EMERGENT PROCESS MANAGEMENT

John Debenham

Abstract

Emergent processes are business processes whose execution is determined by the prior knowledge of the agents involved and by the knowledge that emerges during a process instance. The amount of process knowledge that is relevant to a knowledge-driven process can be enormous and may include common sense knowledge. If a process’ knowledge can not be represented feasibly then that process can not be managed; although its execution may be partially supported. In an e-market domain, the majority of transactions, including trading orders, requests for advice and information, are knowledge-driven processes for which the knowledge base is the Internet, and so representing the knowledge is not at issue. Multiagent systems are an established platform for managing complex business processes. What is needed for emergent process management is an intelligent agent that is driven not by a process goal, but by an in-flow of knowledge, where each chunk of knowledge may be uncertain. These agents should assess the extent to which it chooses to believe that the information is correct, and so they require an inference mechanism that can cope with information of differing integrity. An agent is described that achieves this by using ideas from information theory, and by using maximum entropy logic to derive integrity estimates for knowledge about which it is uncertain. Emergent processes are managed by these agents that extract the process knowledge from this knowledge base — the Internet — using a suite of data mining bots. The agents make no assumptions about the internals of the other agents in the system including their motivations, logic, and whether they are conscious of a utility function. These agents focus only on the information in the signals that they receive.

References

  1. Bernhardt, D. and Miao, J. (2004). Informed trading when information becomes stale. The Journal of Finance, LIX(1).
  2. Debenham, J. (2000). Supporting strategic process. In Proceedings Fifth International Conference on The Practical Application of Intelligent Agents and MultiAgents, pages 237 - 256. Practical Applications Co.
  3. Debenham, J. (2003). An eNegotiation Framework. In The Twenty-Third International Conference on Innovative Techniques and Applications of Artificial Intelligence, AI'2003, pages 79 - 92. Springer Verlag.
  4. Debenham, J. (2004). Bargaining with information. In Jennings, N., Sierra, C., Sonenberg, L., and Tambe, M., editors, Proceedings Third International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi Agent Systems AAMAS-2004, pages 664 - 671. ACM.
  5. Dourish, P. (1998). Using metalevel techniques in a flexible toolkit for CSCW applications. ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (TOCHI), 5(2):109 - 155.
  6. Fischer, L. (2003). The Workflow Handbook 2003. Future Strategies Inc.
  7. Halpern, J. (2003). Reasoning about Uncertainty. MIT Press.
  8. Jaynes, E. (1957). Information theory and statistical mechanics: Part I. Physical Review, 106:620 - 630.
  9. Kraus, S. (2001). Strategic Negotiation in Multiagent Environments. MIT Press.
  10. MacKay, D. (2003). Information Theory, Inference and Learning Algorithms. Cambridge University Press.
  11. Pietra, S. D., Pietra, V. D., and Lafferty, J. (1997). Inducing features of random fields. IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 19(2):380- 393.
  12. Ramchurn, S., Jennings, N., Sierra, C., and Godo, L. (2003). A computational trust model for multi-agent interactions based on confidence and reputation. In Proceedings 5th Int. Workshop on Deception, Fraud and Trust in Agent Societies.
  13. Singh, M. (2004). Business Process Management: A Killer Ap for Agents? In Jennings, N., Sierra, C., Sonenberg, L., and Tambe, M., editors, Proceedings Third International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi Agent Systems AAMAS-2004, pages 26 - 27. ACM.
  14. Smith, H. and Fingar, P. (2003). Business Process Management (BPM): The Third Wave. Meghan-Kiffer Press.
  15. van der Aalst, W. and van Hee, K. (2002). Workflow Management: Models, Methods, and Systems. The MIT Press.
Download


Paper Citation


in Harvard Style

Debenham J. (2005). AN AGENT FOR EMERGENT PROCESS MANAGEMENT . In Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems - Volume 4: ICEIS, ISBN 972-8865-19-8, pages 3-10. DOI: 10.5220/0002519400030010


in Bibtex Style

@conference{iceis05,
author={John Debenham},
title={AN AGENT FOR EMERGENT PROCESS MANAGEMENT},
booktitle={Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems - Volume 4: ICEIS,},
year={2005},
pages={3-10},
publisher={SciTePress},
organization={INSTICC},
doi={10.5220/0002519400030010},
isbn={972-8865-19-8},
}


in EndNote Style

TY - CONF
JO - Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems - Volume 4: ICEIS,
TI - AN AGENT FOR EMERGENT PROCESS MANAGEMENT
SN - 972-8865-19-8
AU - Debenham J.
PY - 2005
SP - 3
EP - 10
DO - 10.5220/0002519400030010